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Posts tagged ‘Hackers’

Dangerous Distraction Drains Dollars


Hackers want to install a very nasty virus in your computer. Nastier than Alec Baldwin in Glengarry Glen Ross.

The thought of it makes me shiver.

A very dangerous Trojan (worse than a virus) is making the rounds on Facebook.

It’s sneaky.

It behaves like a virus in some ways, it can be much more dangerous to you and your loved ones. It’s kind of like the government.

If this nasty Trojan infects your device, it can find your bank account and drain all of your cash.

And,  it spreads from people you know and trust. YIKES!

Though the virus is almost a decade old, it’s still active and very dangerous.

Having security software helps, but it’s not bulletproof. There’s still a chance that it can make its way around your anti-virus software.

Am I scaring you yet?

The best way to prevent this potential catastrophe is to avoid it.

Make sure you share this tip with all of your friends and family on Facebook!

You definitely don’t want this dangerous virus stealing their cash! You may need to borrow some of it from them in the future.

The malware in question is called “Zeus.” In most cases, it looks like a funny or shocking video one of your friends posted. It may be posted on their page or in a message to you.

No, it’s not a video of your first birthday party when your diaper fell off and your face was smeared in chocolate cake. It’s worse than that. Worse than your mother-in-law’s plot against you.

Once you click the link to the “video,” it will tell you that you need to update the player to watch it.

When you try to do that, (update the player) you download the virus. Tricky little devils aren’t they.

When you click the “Play” button, you’re actually clicking “Like” on the virus page. It will spread the link to all of your friends to try to infect them.

I knew there was something very suspicious about that “Like” button.

Don’t fall for it. If you get a message from your friend about such a video, ask them if they meant to send it. If they giggle when they answer you, well, they probably did sent it.

In most cases, they won’t even know that they are spamming you (though I’m sure many of them would love to spam you).

From what I understand, you can also search the title of the video in question on Google, YouTube, or by consulting your local witch doctor.

If nothing turns up, you’ll know the video is a scam, or they’re all in on it too.

Oh no.  It’s a conspiracy!

Hmmm…

Malware is still all around,

Trojans and viruses abound,

They’ll steal all your money,

And, honey that’s not funny,

Prevention can always be found.

 

Don’t fall for a trick or a con,

Your security should always be on,

Don’t download that spam,

Or you’ll be in a jam,

The conclusion is all but forgone.

 © 2013 Ronald J. Yarosh

See more at: http://www.komando.com/coolsites/index.aspx?id=14620&utm_medium=nl&utm_source=alerts&utm_content=2013-06-05-article-in-body-d#sthash.dP0ionKU.dpuf

Alert Aussies Arrest Aggressive Attacker


Good news everybody!

Australian Federal Police have arrested the self-proclaimed leader of the international hacking group, LulzSec. It’s the collective that claimed responsibility for infiltrating and shutting down the CIA website.

Police reported the 24 year old IT worker was arrested in Sydney and charged with hacking crimes which could earn him 10 years in prison.

Police said the man was arrested at his work place where he had access to “sensitive information from clients including government agencies.”

LulzSec is an offshoot of the international hacking group, Anonymous. It has taken credit for hacking attacks on government and private sector computers including the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), Sony Pictures, 20th Century Fox Studios, and Nintendo.

The two cyber hacking groups became notorious in late 2010 when they launched what they called the “first cyber war” in retaliation for attempts to shut down the Wiki leaks website.

The name LulzSec is a combination of “lulz” which is apparently another way of writing lols, and the word security.

You can learn more at this web site:

http://www.nbcnews.com/technology/technolog/lulzsec-leader-arrested-australian-cops-say-6C9576130

 Hmmm…. 

They caught a mighty big hacker,

He wasn’t your everyday slacker;

He made cyber war,

But not anymore,

He’s now one jailed attacker.

© 2013 Ronald J. Yarosh

Crafty QR Codes Confound Crooks


There’s a lot of counterfeiting of goods and currencies going on these days. Scientists are working on ways to counter act the counterfeiters.

They have upgraded QR codes to help in that effort.

Quick Response (QR) codes are applied to products and advertising, and are found just about everywhere.

QRs are those little, funny looking squares with smudges on them usually found on the corners.

New codes have been developed which will hamper the efforts of the counterfeiters of profitable products and even money.

You will be able to scan them with a smart phone and go to the company’s web site to determine if they are the real thing.

Hmmm…

QR codes are now on the scene.

To crooks that really is mean.

They won’t capture the codes,

To steal mother loads.

But smart phones can, isn’t that keen?

© 2013 Ronald J. Yarosh

Sneaky Smartphone Spyware Snoops


According to CNBC, http://www.cnbc.com/id/100431624 there is a new Android App out there disguised as a “Droid Cleaner”.

It can attack your smart phone and your PC.

Once installed on your device, it can spy on you.

The malware was discovered by the Kaspersky security company.

The app which is found in the Google Play app store, is touted as a tool to free up memory in Google’s operating system.

It can also find its way into a PC as well if users plug an infected device into a PC with a USB drive.

The bug takes over the microphone on a PC and uses it to eavesdrop on users. When a sound is picked up by the mike it records the audio and sends it to the cyber criminals.

However, if a user has a current version of Microsoft Windows the malware should not get into the PC.

Apparently, the spy junk is only targeting older versions of Windows. The PC attack is really focused at users that are using older versions of Microsoft Windows.

 

The spyware can do the following in an infected device:

  • Sending SMS messages
  • Enabling Wi-Fi
  • Gathering information about the device
  • Opening arbitrary links in a browser
  • Uploading the SD card’s entire contents
  • Uploading all SMS messages
  • Deleting all SMS messages
  • Uploading all the contacts/photos/coordinates from the device master.

Hmmm…

There’s an app that spies thru your phone,

It’s a sneaky thing like an air drone.

It uploads your stuff,

And if that’s not enough,

It won’t leave your PC alone.

 

© 2013 Ronald J. Yarosh

Kids Concoct Computer Codes


According to BBC Tech News,  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-21371609  children as young as 11 years old are writing malicious computer code to hack accounts on gaming sites and social networks.

Researchers found many instances of malware targeting games popular with children.

They found that the malware was used to steal the data and send it to a specific email address.

A report from antivirus company AVG detailed evidence of computer programs written by children. They are used to “steal” game related virtual currency.

I bet the victims really got hacked off.

 

Hmmm…

Young kids are now into hacking,

It’s ethics that they are lacking.

They steal secret code and data,

To the kids it doesn’t matter.

They write their malicious code,

Looking for the mother lode.

They hack friends to steal their money,

To the victims it isn’t funny.

What to do, we do not know,

So the hacked in data flows.

 

© 2013 Ronald J. Yarosh

Paper Penetrated by Plucky Poachers


Here we go again…

According to The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) the same group of hackers that penetrated the New York Times also cracked into their private accounts as well.

The Journal reported that the hackers were looking for news stories involving China.

The attack was generated via computers in Beijing.

Of course, Chinese government officials have denied any cyber attacks of American businesses.

Hmmm…

The Chinese hacked into the Journal,

The owners thought it was infernal.

They’re hitting the papers,

And other news makers,

They want to find every news kernel.

© 2013 Ronald J. Yarosh

Facebook Fraud Fiends


This isn’t funny at all…

I got this in an email from  Kim Komando site today:

http://www.komando.com/tips/index.aspx?id=13509&utm_medium=nl&utm_source=alert&utm_content=2012-10-25-main

Hackers are sending out more scam email than ever before. That’s probably because it works!

Too many people click on links in email without thinking about how unsafe it is. Don’t be one of those people!

The latest scam to watch for is a fake email supposedly from Facebook. The email says that someone left an offensive comment on your Facebook wall and tells you to click a button to see the comment.

Of course, if you click the button you’re taken to a malicious site that looks like a Facebook profile page. The page installs the Blackhole exploit on your system, which allows hackers to remotely install other malware, including viruses that can steal your personal information!

There is a quick way you can tell this email is a fake. The sender address is faceb00k.com instead of facebook.com. That’s a common hacker trick that’s easy to miss.

However, even if the email sender did say facebook.com, it might still be a trick. Your best bet for staying safe is to open your browser and log in to your Facebook account manually.

If someone really did post something on your wall, it will show up as a notification in your profile. And you don’t have to worry about accidentally visiting a malicious website.

Hackers are sending out more scam email than ever before. That’s probably because it works!

Too many people click on links in email without thinking about how unsafe it is. Don’t be one of those people!

The latest scam to watch for is a fake email supposedly from Facebook. The email says that someone left an offensive comment on your Facebook wall and tells you to click a button to see the comment.

Of course, if you click the button you’re taken to a malicious site that looks like a Facebook profile page. The page installs the Blackhole exploit on your system, which allows hackers to remotely install other malware, including viruses that can steal your personal information!

There is a quick way you can tell this email is a fake. The sender address is faceb00k.com instead of facebook.com. That’s a common hacker trick that’s easy to miss.

However, even if the email sender did say facebook.com, it might still be a trick. Your best bet for staying safe is to open your browser and log in to your Facebook account manually.

If someone really did post something on your wall, it will show up as a notification in your profile. And you don’t have to worry about accidentally visiting a malicious website.

Routers Rerouting Rides


Auto manufacturers are building cars filled with computer chips, allowing the vehicle to be controlled wirelessly.

Now, security experts think those cars may be susceptible to hackers who may take control over vital systems such as breaking, acceleration, my favorite radio station where I listen to The Dennis Miller show daily, and perhaps back seat drivers.

Actually that last one wouldn’t be so bad.

All it will take is a rip roaring router and the right software.

This is a perfect  example of why I’ll never get a computer chip installed in my brain again.

Some hacker will find out and have me walking around in circles, or make me burp in the middle of an important speech at an AMWAY meeting.

Hmmm…

Hackers may drive your new car,

They’ll do from places afar;

They’ll do it with routers,

They’ll make you scream louder,

They’ll do it where ever you are.

Hackers Hefty Heist


Imagine this:

Some beady eyed hackers have stolen around 78 million from banks using a malware virus called Zeus.

Of course that doesn’t beat the trillions of dollars the U.S. government is wasting. Who’s the bigger crook?

See, your mother was right. Hiding your money under your mattress is safer.

Hmmm…

Hackers are stealing from banks,

They get money without saying thanks,

They use what’s called Zeus,

It’s pure banking abuse,

They get Deutsche Marks as well as French Francs

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